1. Help Centre
  2. Understanding my driving behaviour

What does Brightmile understand about my driving behaviour?

What are the 5 pillars?

We base our assessment of your driving on Five Pillars: Risk, Speeding, Distraction, Fatigue, and Eco.
 
Risk Icon Risk 
Risk increases when you drive too fast for your surroundings and collisions are more likely to occur around more complex road infrastructure.
A Risk Event is triggered when you either (a) drive over the legal speed limit near junctions, traffic lights, or school zones, (b) drive too fast to safely corner around sharp bends and winding roads, or (c) drive too fast to safely come to a complete stop at stop signs and give way/yield junctions.
It might sound complicated at first, but to give you a clear view of how you are performing on average over a meaningful distance, the metric we focus on is Risk Events per 62 miles (or 100 kilometres).
Therefore, your 2 week average Risk score is your rolling average Risk Events per 62 miles (or 100 kilometres) from your previous two weeks (or 14 days) of driving, as updated each day.
For the Risk pillar, we also help you understand your most common risk exposure in the last 14 days as well as advice on how you can improve.
Most common risk

Speeding IconSpeeding

The Brightmile Driver App measures the percentage of driving time spent above legal speed limits.
Your 2 week average Speeding score is your rolling average percentage of time spent speeding from your previous two weeks (or 14 days) of driving, as updated each day.
We don’t focus on individual events as we feel that it is more effective to look at trends over time and identify whether you regularly exceed the limit.
Despite using the best available mapping data that is frequently updated in new releases of the app, this trend-based analysis means that if we occasionally refer to a speed limit that has subsequently been updated this won't have a material impact on your overall Speeding score.
We also give you a small buffer to make sure that are not penalised for small inaccuracies in your car speedometer.

distraction iconDistraction

Smartphone distraction causes around 30% of road incidents making it statistically more dangerous than drink driving
You might not realise how often you use your phone whilst driving
The Brightmile Driver App records each interaction with the smartphone whilst driving (other than a phone call conducted using a hands-free kit) as a Distraction Event.
To give you a clear view of how you are performing on average over a meaningful distance, the metric we focus on is Distraction Events per 62 miles (or 100 kilometres).
Therefore, your 2 week average Distraction score is your rolling average Distraction Events per 62 miles (or 100 kilometres) from your previous two weeks (or 14 days) of driving, as updated each day.

Fatigue IconFatigue

Driving fatigued increases the likelihood that you will have an accident.
We recommend that you take a short break after 2 hours of driving, so if you don’t do so you are at greater risk of fatigue.
The Fatigue Pillar measures how many minutes you have driven after 2 hours without taking a break, i.e. when you might be at greater risk of fatigue.
For example, if you make a trip of 2 hours and 27 minutes without taking a break, we would record 27 minutes at risk of Fatigue.
To give you a clear view of how you are performing on average over a meaningful distance, the metric we focus on is minutes driven at risk of Fatigue per 62 miles (or 100 kilometres).
Therefore, your 2 week average Fatigue score is your rolling average minutes driven at risk of Fatigue per 62 miles (or 100 kilometres) from your previous two weeks (or 14 days) of driving, as updated each day.

Eco IconEco

Driving style has a significant impact on fuel usage and therefore the environment.
The Brightmile Driver App detects incidents of harsh acceleration and records each incident as an Eco event.
To give you a clear view of how you are performing on average over a meaningful distance, the metric we focus on is Eco Events per 62 miles (or 100 kilometres).
Therefore, your 2 week average Eco score is your rolling average Eco Events per 62 miles (or 100 kilometres) from your previous two weeks (or 14 days) of driving, as updated each day.